Sawshark Teeth For Sale

Find one of the largest and most comprehensive selections of sawshark teeth for sale directly below. We know how hard it is to find certain species of shark teeth, such as those from the sawshark (order Pristiophoriformes). In an effort to make the process easier for collectors like ourselves, we launched SharkTeethStore.com. Now, along with sawshark teeth, we offer our visitors access to the teeth from dozens of other shark species, including the megalodon and great white.

6 RARE MIOCENE EPOCH FOSSILIZED SAWSHARK TEETH Florida fossil tooth
6 RARE MIOCENE EPOCH FOSSILIZED SAWSHARK TEETH Florida fossil tooth
$8.50
Time Remaining: 2h 20m
Buy It Now for only: $8.50
7 RARE MIOCENE EPOCH FOSSILIZED SAWSHARK TEETH Florida fossil tooth
7 RARE MIOCENE EPOCH FOSSILIZED SAWSHARK TEETH Florida fossil tooth
$12.00
Time Remaining: 6d 9h 25m
Buy It Now for only: $12.00
8 RARE MIOCENE EPOCH FOSSILIZED SAWSHARK TEETH Florida fossil tooth
8 RARE MIOCENE EPOCH FOSSILIZED SAWSHARK TEETH Florida fossil tooth
$9.50
Time Remaining: 26d 1h 11m
Buy It Now for only: $9.50

Sawshark Information and Facts

Sawsharks refer to a group of sharks with large bladed snouts belonging to the Pristiophoriformes order. Sawsharks use their snouts for both attacking prey and defending against natural predators. When hunting, they'll swing their snout around to try and cut their prey, rendering it unable to escape. The sawshark will then use its sharp serrated teeth and jaw to devour their prey.

As of 2012, taxonomists and marine biologists have identified a total of 6 species belonging to the sawshark family (order Pristiophoriformes). Here are the following sawshark species:

  • Pristiophorus schroederi (Bahamas sawshark)
  • Pristiophorus nudipinnis (Shortnose sawshark)
  • Pristiophorus nancyae (African dwarf sawshark)
  • Pristiophorus japonicus (Japanese sawshark)
  • Pristiophorus delicatus (Tropical sawshark)
  • Pristiophorus cirratus (Longnose sawshark)
  • Pliotrema warreni (Sixgill sawshark)

Note: The sixgill sawshark is the only species in the Pilotrema genus.

The size and physical characteristics vary depending on the species of sawshark, but all of them contain similar bladed snouts. Typically, most sawshark species have two prominent dorsal fins, 5 gill silts (with the exception of the sixgill sawshark) and range in lengths from 4 to 6 feet.

Sawsharks live in a vareity of ocean conditions throughout the world. Most commonly, they can be found in the warm waters of the Bahamas, off South Africa, Australia and Japan. While they usually stay in fairly shallow water (under 100 feet), divers have spotted them in much deeper conditions (1000+ feet).

Sawsharks roam the ocean floor in search of edible prey. They use their barbels to detect the electrical currents generated by squid, crustaceans and other nearby fish. When the sawshark finds a suitable prey, it will thrash its head back and forth to slash and disable the unsuspecting prey.

Although some species of sawshark are rare (sixgill), scientists believe their population numbers are healthy. Commercial and recreational fishermen frequently catch sawsharks on lines. Once caught, they're either sold to local fish markets or kept and cooked for the meat they provide.

Collecting Sawshark Teeth

In addition to their powerful bladed snouts, sawsharks also possess some pretty serious teeth. While their teeth aren't as serrated as the great white or megalodons, they are much thinner and pointier, allowing them to penetrate deep into their prey. In fact, there are very few sharks which have teeth as pointy as the sawshark. In terms of appearance, they could be described best as stiletto-shaped teeth.

Something that you may notice with a lot of sawshark teeth is a small barbed hook on the end. These barbed hooks are used for snatching and holding on to their prey so they can't escape.